Photos without filters? That’s crazy talk!

| July 1, 2012

A typical Instagram photo from my account, boring subject made exciting thanks to a filter!

Late last Friday night, hipsters all over the world uttered a cry as their favorite social networking app, Instagram, hit the fritz. For a few hours foodies were unable to document the artisanal designs swirled in their morning cappuccino and fashionistas had to keep mirror-snapshots of their outfits to themselves. Tweets (hashtagged as #instatrippin) uttered fears of going back to…hold your breath…unfiltered photos.

The story goes that storms on the east coast momentarily shut down Instagram’s servers. Preposterous! How dare nature encroach upon our addiction to technology?

I will admit, I am one of these “victims”. Stress at losing all 550 of my hazy, soft-focus photos haunted me for hours. All those memories, lost forever!

A sigh of relief came when the photography app was fixed last night. Albums were restored and we were able to post our pseudo-artsy photos once again.

This hysteria brought to light how terribly dependent most of us are when it comes to social networking. Without the ability to share the most mundane (but interesting to us) aspects of our daily lives, how are we supposed to show how cool we are to the rest of the world?

It’s an incredibly humbling thing actually, to realize how narcissistic we can all be from time to time. It’s a slippery slope. We begin to measure our self-worth by how many “likes” a photo, tweet, or status gets or how many followers we have, instead of focusing on our connections to the real people in our lives.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m happy that I can once again make my pictures pretty with Instagram. Instant gratification is addictive. But I’m beginning to realize that you can enjoy life without having to take an artsy photo of it.

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Category: Blogs, The Creative Native

About the Author (Author Profile)

Sara Murphy

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  1. Rocko Jerome says:

    I would go a step farther and say you don’t really need to take pictures at all. I think we were maybe better off when photos were kind of a special occasion. I think it’s stunted our imaginations a bit.